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Fix image formatting for web browser notif post

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Brandon Nolet 2 months ago
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1 changed files with 4 additions and 4 deletions
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      content/posts/web-browser-notifications.md

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content/posts/web-browser-notifications.md View File

@@ -30,20 +30,20 @@ Most websites that want you to enable notifications (for one reason or another),

But then *Le Devoir* did something differently. They asked me directly, through the viewport, whether I wanted to be notified of newsworthy articles like so:

[](/img/le-devoir-notification-prompt.png)
![Le Devoir notification prompt](/img/le-devoir-notification-prompt.png)

Instead of simply poking the browser to say "Hey, I want permission to send the user notifications," they asked me, the user, whether I wanted to receive the notifications they wished to send me.

This is a start contrast to the way Chrome just pops up something above the entire Chrome UI asking if the website can send notifications:

[](/img/chrome-notification-prompt.png)
![Chrome notification prompt](/img/chrome-notification-prompt.png)

But even Firefox has gotten better by simply wiggling a notification message icon in the URL bar rather than just popping up their equivalient of the prompt:

[](/img/firefox-notification-prompt.png)
![Firefox notification prompt](/img/firefox-notification-prompt.png)

# Conclusion

Something about having the notification permission prompt pop over the UI irks me more than just seeing the prompt I was delivered from *Le Devoir*, via the website's viewport. It's much more of an intrusion and lifeless interaction. There's very little context given as to what notifications I'll be sent, of what use they'll be to me, and why the website wishes to send me notifications in the first place.

If web developers could have a little more humanity and stop seeing every web browser as just a client of a website and as a person who's browsing the web, maybe the behaviour of prompts like this would change to be a little less jarring.
If web developers could have a little more humanity and stop seeing every web browser as just a client of a website and as a person who's browsing the web, maybe the behaviour of prompts like this would change to be a little less jarring.

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